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Your pet peeves about living in France

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Gillou
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MessagePosté le: 04 Mai 2005 23:58    Sujet du message:

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eve a écrit:
remember the strikes in '95 when there were no subways or buses for like a month ? Shocked


Yes, i remember for sure, since i just moved to Paris at that time Smile and it was somewhere like an "end of world" atmosphere, had the feeling to be in a city completely apart from the rest of the world, another dimension Laughing it was a bit like in those anticipation movies "how the world will be if our civilization doesn't have oil anymore" or more exactly "New York has been surrended and changed into a giant prison with absolutely no contact with the outside world", it was an exciting experience indeed! Laughing

However, i tend to disagree with this:

eve a écrit:
Though the "positive" aspect is that people are pretty forgiving when there's a strike, if you're late for class or anything.


That may be right for universities and schools but not always for jobs. Had a friend who called her office to say she couldn't come because all the public transportation were on strike that day, and she's been told that she had to come AND be on time (take a taxi, and her job was pretty far), otherwise she may have "problems"....i also remember the Galeries Lafayette sales ladies complaining on TV during the 95' strikes that if they didn't come to work more than 3 days they would be fired. And at that time it could be very difficult to go to work depending on the place you lived!! and i think it happened to some of them... so me i didn't really mind since i was a student but people feeling the pressure to lose their job must have had a very hard time.
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Hokum
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MessagePosté le: 07 Mai 2005 17:18    Sujet du message:

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Citation:
"New York has been surrended and changed into a giant prison with absolutely no contact with the outside world"


Yes, the only thing missing was Snake Plissken in an extraction mission to take Chirac out of the Elysée (and, err, well they should have launched one) ^^

And I agree with Gillou. Though they'll probably "understand" why you're being late, you'll be expected to compensate for it in most companies I think (and to make it worst, when located in the Defense area... a nice place to go when you can only take your car -_- ).

Citation:
What links or differences do you do between chauvinism, patriotism, love of the country and nationalism?


I think that what makes the french so "gallic" lays in the usual ignorance displayed towards other cultures, even among the middle class.
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jolan
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MessagePosté le: 08 Mai 2005 03:34    Sujet du message:

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I also don't really appreciate the "going on strike" attitudes int the French society. I don't really think it is efficient, especially since having everybody participating is pretty tough. For those who work for private companies, well, making rallies and demo everyday other week is just impossible. In these times, I always remember President Reagan when he fired ALL air controllers who went on strike for more than 3 weeks (which totally screwed the country)...

What I dislike the most with french politics is that it looks like a monarchy.

And yes, the street of Paris are kinda dirty...
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Sonka
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MessagePosté le: 11 Mai 2005 13:29    Sujet du message:

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alucard a écrit:
Do you think it is normal to think so, to think your country is the best country of the world or do you think it is uncomprehensible.
I often hear this kind of remark about French chauvinism. I think it's more about joking than about real chauvinism. Of course there are real chauvinists/nationalists in France, as are in all countries in the world. But I think most cases of chauvinism are jokes. I don't know anybody who thinks "our country is the best country of the world", although they can sometimes say things in that sense. For instance, my dad keeps saying "Don't you agree that it would be much better if all the people in the world would speak French?", but this doesn't mean that he really wants French to take over all other languages or that he thinks it is the best language in the world. This is just a humoristic way of hiding his shame of not knowing any foreign language at all.

Then I think maybe some foreigners lack of a sense of humour or at least of a sense of typically French humour ? Laughing Just as strange as is British humour maybe...
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De ci de là
2eme Dan
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MessagePosté le: 17 Juin 2005 10:27    Sujet du message:

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One more word about the expression "pet peeve", especially the "pet" part of it. A pet is normally some (small) animal that keeps you company, like a cat or a dog. To pet an animal could be translated in French by "caresser un animal".
So "a pet peeve" is something that lives with you and irritates you every single time, something that you can't stand, as if it followed you everywhere like a dog, as if you kind of fed it regularly.

I do remember those strikes in 95. I used to live in Paris and I would go on long walks across the city, in the middle of winter, freezing my behind.
It was great though, because it was still the carefree days for me, and those long strolls from the "Jules Joffrin" subway station in the 18th arrondissement to the "Javel" station in the icy winter were invigorating and gave me a lot of time to take in the city and its people.
Back to the topic : my personal pet peeve is dogs and their owners' education or lack thereof. I have a few questions for them :

  • What's up with allowing Rex the doberman to drop a steaming pile of dung right in the middle of the sidewalk and leaving it there for passers by to enjoy and do the moon walk onto ?
  • Do you really need to allow Roxy the French pooddle to weave her way through the crowd of Boulevard Haussman, still attached to that annoying extensible leash ?
  • Do you really think that when your supersized great Dane is barking his lungs off at some young girl, your saying "But he's harmless !" is reassuring enough ?
  • Could you interrupt your nice little chat with your buddies when Jaws your mad pitbull lunges at me in an attempt to playfully chew my arm off ?

I like dogs in general but too many owners are in dire need of an education.
That really gets me.
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eve
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MessagePosté le: 10 Juil 2005 00:58    Sujet du message:

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I'm not bothered by dogs, but I surely do mind the droppings on the street. So many things have been tried against them, and yet the number doesn't seem to have decreased much.
People just need to take their responsabilities and get used to the idea they have to pick them up, as unpleasant as it may be.
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De ci de là
2eme Dan
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MessagePosté le: 11 Juil 2005 15:21    Sujet du message:

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Hmm...Are there only two people on this side of ForumJapon to drop their chunks of wisdom on the slippery subject of dogs and their unsightly outputs ? Wink

Among other possible petpeeves, there are the american clichés of the so-called French arrogance, and the French lack of hygiene. Those clichés border on racial slurs, actually.
As a French man, I have never felt that French people were particularly more arrogant than, say, americans, or dirtier than the other peoples of the Earth, yet as I travel I keep hearing about this : people make comments about it, even if not directed directly at me (I'm such a clean, humble person Wink )
When I ask them for concrete examples, they often come up with the infamous surly-waiter trauma, but nothing about hygiene.

Any personal experience on this anyone ? Do Japanese share these clichés ?
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Qcumber
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MessagePosté le: 01 Oct 2006 16:25    Sujet du message:

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Hokum a écrit:
I think that what makes the french so "gallic" lays in the usual ignorance displayed towards other cultures, even among the middle class.


I have travelled quite enough and I can tell you that jingoism, arrogance and ill-breeding are common to all Europeans, more so in the North, particularly in Britain. Laughing
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Qcumber
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MessagePosté le: 01 Oct 2006 16:34    Sujet du message:

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De ci de là a écrit:
Any personal experience on this anyone ? Do Japanese share these clichés ?

French bashing is not new in the Anglo-Saxon world. It seems to date beack to the One-Hundred-Year War. It's even a political ploy; see how the Bush administration used it during the Irak controversy at the UNO. The problem is now made worse by the Internet and the globality of the English language because French haters can publicize their slurs all the easier. As nothing can be done against this evil, the best is to ignore and despise them.

I'd rather read sincere criticisms by un-americanized Japanese visitors and expats.
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Danscot
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MessagePosté le: 17 Mar 2007 16:07    Sujet du message: PET Bottle, or the "Hundred Years' War"

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De ci de là a écrit:
[...]

Among other possible petpeeves, there are the american clichés of the so-called French arrogance, and the French lack of hygiene. Those clichés border on racial slurs, actually.
As a French man, I have never felt that French people were particularly more arrogant than, say, americans, or dirtier than the other peoples of the Earth, yet as I travel I keep hearing about this : people make comments about it, even if not directed directly at me (I'm such a clean, humble person Wink )
When I ask them for concrete examples, they often come up with the infamous surly-waiter trauma, but nothing about hygiene.

Any personal experience on this anyone ? Do Japanese share these clichés ?


As you pointed out, arrogance has no boundaries. Many Englishmen consider Americans or Australians as extremely arrogant and... vice versa!

Thus, long after the "Hundred Years' War", the Anglo-saxon world seems to be eternally at war, here and there, over the planet.

Now, I don't know if the Japanese really "share" these offensive clichés, but they often echo them, just repeating the rumours. It just means the propaganda is efficent and well organized!

Goldsmith wrote that the English are as silent as the Japanese Laughing Their taciturnity may be accounted for by their fondness for modesty and their fear of being intrusive on one hand, but also by their inordinate pride on the other. But as a whole, they seldom speak about themselves. They do not induldge in feelings and, as Emerson put it, " Every one of these islanders is an island himself, safe, tranquil, incommunicable" which may be the reason why they are unable to ''belong'' abroad and carry their own clubs with them.

But after all, all these so-called English or Japanese traits may be another (auto-) cliché... If this is SILENCE, then I am a grave Cool
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