Forum Japon

 

[ S'enregistrer ]   [ Rechercher ]    [ Liste des Membres ]    [ Groupes d'utilisateurs ]   [ FAQ ]  
[ Connexion ]   [ Mes messages privés ]   [ Profil ]
Divorce et enlèvements internationaux d'enfants: enfin le bout du tunnel?

Recherche Rapide :
Aller à la page 1, 2, 3, 4  Suivante
 
Poster un nouveau sujet   Répondre au sujet    ForumJapon.com Index du Forum -> Le Japon dans le Monde
Voir le sujet précédent :: Voir le sujet suivant  
Auteur Message
ElectronLibre
Modérateur


Inscrit le: 20 Oct 2007
Messages: 1454
Points: 16361
Pays, Ville: Jiyuudenshirando

MessagePosté le: 10 Mai 2008 04:19    Sujet du message: Divorce et enlèvements internationaux d'enfants: enfin le bout du tunnel?

 Note du Post : 3   Nombre d'avis : 1
Répondre en citant

Etat des lieux:
Citation:
According to Japan's Ministry of Health, Labour, and Welfare, there have been fewer marriages between Japanese in recent years: weddings steadily dropped from 764,161 in 1995 to 680,906 in 2004, an 11% decrease.
In the same time period, international marriages, where one partner is Japanese, have jumped from 27,727 to 39,551 couples, or a 43% increase. (And let's answer the inevitable question of "Who's marrying whom?": Perhaps counterintuitively (but not so when you consider how many farmers import brides), overwhelmingly more Japanese men marry foreigners than the other way around--at a ratio of nearly eight to two, and growing!)
However, perhaps because people prefer to leave the altar with smiles and hope for happy endings, less attention is paid to divorce figures. Between 1995 and 2004, broken unions in Japan also increased nearly without pause: from 199,016 to 270,804 divorces, a 36% increase. Of those, however, divorces between Japanese have plateaued, even decreased, in recent years. International divorces, however, have increased steadily, nearly doubling within the same time period (for Japanese men-Foreign women: from 6,153 to 12,071 divorces; for Japanese women-Foreign men: from 1,839 to 3,228 divorces). (...)
BUT WHAT ABOUT THE CHILDREN?
Divorce proceedings and the aftermath are tough on the kids in any society, but Japan further complicates things through legal negligence. During separation, divorce court, and onwards, the parent who does not have custody may have problems meeting the children for more than a few hours a month, if at all. Visitation rights are not granted before the divorce is complete, but even then, Japan has no legal mechanism to enforce visitation rights or other court-negotiated settlements afterwards.
Also, enforcement mechanisms for the payment of alimony or child support have loopholes. For example, if your spouse owes you money but refuses to pay, you must know the home address, the workplace, and bank account details of your spouse in order to seek redress. However, if your spouse changes any of these things and happens not to notify you, you will have to track down those details yourself, which often requires hiring your own private detective. The police or government officials will not get involved.
MULTINATIONAL MARRIAGES COME OFF WORST
What makes this situation especially difficult for international, and especially intercontinental, divorces is that foreign partners have extreme difficulty being granted custody of children in Japan. In a March 31, 2006 interview with the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, lawyer Jeremy D. Morely, of the International Family Law Office in New York, stated:

"Children are not returned from Japan, period, and it is a situation that happens a lot with children of international marriages with kids who are over in Japan. They do not get returned. Usually, the parent who has kept a child is Japanese, and under the Japanese legal system they have a family registration system whereby every Japanese family has their own registration with a local ward office. And the name of registration system is the koseki system. So every Japanese person has their koseki, and a child is listed on the appropriate koseki. Once a child is listed on the family register, the child belongs to that family. Foreigners don't have a family register and so there is no way for them to actually have a child registered as belonging to them in Japan. There is an international treaty called the Hague Convention on the civil aspects of international child abduction, and Japan is the only G7 country that is not a party to the Hague Convention."[1]
This means that if things go intercontinentally ballistic (say, a Japanese spouse abducts a foreigner's children back to Japan), the foreigner will lose all contact with them, according to the Children's Rights Network.
Even if the foreigner tries to go through proper domestic channels, he loses. One clear example is the Murray Wood Case. Wood, a resident of Canada, was awarded custody of his children in 2004 by Canadian courts. Yet when his children were abducted to Japan by ex-wife Ayako Wood, he found himself powerless to enforce the court order. Not only were the Canadian Government's demands to extradite Ayako ignored by the Japanese government, but also Japan's Saitama District and High Courts awarded custody to her, essentially declaring that "uprooting the children from the current stable household is not in the child's best interest". What then? If the foreigner takes the law into his own hands and abducts them back, he will be arrested for kidnapping by the Japanese police, as was witnessed in a recent case handled by the American Embassy. Consequently, Japan has become a safe haven for international child abductions.
document complet


Mais les choses pourraient fort bien changer.
A titre d'information, un article trouvé sur asahi.com:
Citation:
Japan will sign a treaty obliging the government to return to the rightful parent children of broken international marriages who are wrongfully taken and kept in Japan, sources said Friday.

The Justice Ministry will begin work to review current laws with an eye on meeting requirements under the 1980 Hague Convention on Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction, the sources said. The government plans to conclude the treaty as early as in 2010.

The decision was reached amid criticism against Japan over unauthorized transfer and retention cases involving children. The governments of Canada and the United States have raised the issue with Japan and cited a number of incidents involving their nationals, blasting such acts as tantamount to abductions.

In one case, a Japanese woman who divorced her Canadian husband took their children to Japan for what she said would be a short visit to let the kids see an ailing grandparent. But the woman and her children never returned to Canada.

Once parents return to their home countries with their children, their former spouses are often unable to find their children. In Japan, court rulings and custody orders issued in foreign countries are not recognized.

Under the convention, signatory parties are obliged to set up a "central authority" within their government. The authority works two ways.

It can demand other governments return children unlawfully transferred and retained. But it is also obliged to find the location within its own country of a child unlawfully taken and retained, take measures to prevent the child from being moved out of the country, and support legal procedures to return the child to the rightful parent.

Sources said the Japanese government will likely set up a central authority within the Justice Ministry, which oversees immigration and family registry records. The ministry has decided to work on a new law that will detail the procedures for the children's return.

In 2006, there were about 44,700 marriages between Japanese and foreign nationals in Japan, about 1.5 times the number in 1996. Divorces involving such couples more than doubled from about 8,000 in 1996 to 17,000 in 2006.(IHT/Asahi: May 10,2008) source

_________________
"Chez un homme politique, les études c'est quatre ans de droit, puis toute une vie de travers."
(Coluche)
Revenir en haut
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur Envoyer un message privé
rototo
Modérateur


Inscrit le: 01 Mai 2007
Messages: 1046
Points: 6205
Pays, Ville: Toulouse

MessagePosté le: 01 Déc 2009 08:04    Sujet du message:

 Note du Post : 3   Nombre d'avis : 2
Répondre en citant

La France a décidé de prendre les devants pour amorcer un début de règlement de cette situation et ainsi faire pression sur le nouveau gouvernement japonais afin qu'il signe la convention de La Haye :

Citation:
Création d'un comité France-Japon sur les enlèvements d'enfants

Un comité de consultation franco-japonais s'est réuni pour la première fois mardi à Tokyo pour discuter du cas des enfants séparés d'un de leurs parents à la suite d'un divorce ou d'un conflit.

Le Japon est le seul pays membre du G7 à ne pas avoir signé la Convention de La Haye de 1980 sur les aspects civils des déplacements illicites d'enfants et ne reconnaît pas non plus le droit de visite. Chaque année, 166.000 enfants sont ainsi coupés, le plus souvent définitivement, d'un de leurs parents, selon des statistiques officielles japonaises. Dans 80% des cas, c'est le père, japonais ou étranger, qui perd tous ses droits sur l'enfant.

La France a eu connaissance jusqu'ici de 35 cas d'enlèvement d'enfant concernant des Français. Les Etats-Unis ont eux été saisis de 82 cas impliquant 123 enfants, et le Canada et la Grande-Bretagne, 35 chacun. C'est la raison pour laquelle les ministères français et japonais des Affaires étrangères ont décidé de créer un "Comité de consultation sur l'enfant au centre d'un conflit parental". La France est le premier pays à mettre en place une telle structure avec le Japon. Ce comité "a pour but de faciliter les échanges et le partage d'information (...) en matière de déplacements de mineurs, la localisation et l'état de santé des enfants", indique un communiqué publié par l'ambassade de France. Lors de la réunion de mardi, les représentants français ont remis la liste des 35 cas recensés et "mis l'accent sur les cas les plus difficiles".

Le 16 octobre, lors d'une rencontre avec la ministre de la Justice, Keiko Chiba, l'ambassadeur de France, Philippe Faure, et les ambassadeurs de sept autres pays - Australie, Canada, Espagne, Etats-Unis, Grande-Bretagne, Italie et Nouvelle-Zélande - avaient appelé le nouveau gouvernement japonais de centre-gauche à signer la Convention de La Haye. Ce traité, signé par plus de 80 pays, a fixé des procédures pour assurer le retour des enfants dans leur pays de résidence habituelle et pour protéger le droit d'accès des deux parents.


http://www.aujourdhuilejapon.com/informations-japon-creation-d-un-comite-france-japon-sur-les-enlevements-d-enfants-7203.asp?1=1
_________________
L'abus de modération est dangereux pour la santé. A consommer avec alcool !
Revenir en haut
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur Envoyer un message privé
ElectronLibre
Modérateur


Inscrit le: 20 Oct 2007
Messages: 1454
Points: 16361
Pays, Ville: Jiyuudenshirando

MessagePosté le: 02 Déc 2009 04:08    Sujet du message:

 Note du Post : 3   Nombre d'avis : 1
Répondre en citant

C'est fou, hein !? Tu veux te marier avec un Japonais/une Japonaise, on te demande de coucher sur le papier ton histoire d'amour, c'est tout juste si tu n'es pas obligé(e) de donner l'adresse des cafés où ont eu lieu les rencontres ... et d'autres détails pour lesquels je répondrai habituellement "ça ne regarde que moi !!!" ... Dès qu'il s'agit de régler des contentieux liés à la garde des enfants, joker pour l'autorité publique, on se défausse : "C'est bien triste mais ... ça ne nous regarde pas ; ce problème relève de la sphère privée, nous n'avons pas à intervenir dans les affaires familiales".
... Et oui, Rototo, depuis quelques temps, le gouvernement japonais subit des pressions accrues pour mettre fin à la politique du fait accompli et aligner sa législation sur celle des pays ayant signé la Convention de la Haye, je crois que le cas Savoie n'y est pas pour rien :
Citation:
Briefly: After a couple divorced in America, ex-wife Noriko Savoie absconded with their children to Japan. Then ex-husband Christopher, who had been awarded custody in the U.S., came to Japan to take the kids back. On Sept. 28 he tried to get the children into the American Consulate in Fukuoka, but was barred entry and arrested by the Japanese police for kidnapping.

L'affaire a été relatée à maintes reprises, la citation provient d'un article du Japan Times Online datant du 6 octobre 2009. Si mes souvenirs sont bons, c'est à partir de cette malheureuse affaire que le débat a vraiment été relancé pour de bon. Pressions il y a mais, à l'époque, la réaction des officiels japonais m'a paru peu convaincante ... enfin ! S'il faut croire ce que la presse rapporte, notamment ceci :
Citation:
(...) Le communiqué rappelle que la Convention de La Haye, signée par plus de 80 pays, a fixé des procédures pour assurer le retour des enfants dans leur pays de résidence habituelle et pour protéger le droit d'accès des deux parents.
Interrogé par l'AFP, le ministre japonais des Affaires étrangères, Katsuya Okada, a déclaré que le gouvernement était «en train d'examiner la possibilité» de signer cette Convention.
La ministre de la Justice a indiqué pour sa part qu'elle «comprenait le problème», mais qu'elle devait en parler aux autres membres du gouvernement, selon des participants à la rencontre.
(...)
Source : Cyberpresse.ca

Et selon une autre source, en l'occurrence Aujourd'hui le Japon, en date du 19 octobre 2009, il faudrait compter environ deux ans avant que le Japon mette fin au déplacement illicite d'enfants :
Citation:
Face à la hausse du nombre de cas, le gouvernement de Yukio Hatoyama souhaite accélérer les efforts pour signer la Convention de la Hague sur les aspects civils des déplacements d'enfants. Cependant, il est peu probable qu'une proposition de loi soit soumise devant la Diète, le Parlement japonais, avant 2011 au mieux, selon cette source citée par le quotidien (Yomiuri Shimbun).

... les enfants de parents séparés ne sont pas au bout de leurs peines, les parents non plus d'ailleurs.
Comment dire, l'expression "examiner la possibilité de signer cette convention" ne me dit rien qui vaille. Encore une manière de faire traîner les choses alors que les parents étrangers ne sont pas les seuls touchés par ce phénomène :
Citation:
(...)
Chaque année au Japon, à la suite d'une séparation ou d'un divorce, 166.000 enfants sont coupés, le plus souvent définitivement, d'un de leurs parents, selon des statistiques officielles.
Dans 80% des cas, c'est le père, japonais ou étranger, qui perd tous ses droits sur l'enfant.
(...)

_________________
"Chez un homme politique, les études c'est quatre ans de droit, puis toute une vie de travers."
(Coluche)
Revenir en haut
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur Envoyer un message privé
iriakun
1ere Dan
1ere Dan


Inscrit le: 19 Nov 2010
Messages: 708
Points: 2064

MessagePosté le: 26 Nov 2010 04:48    Sujet du message: Suicide de francais pour enlevement d'enfant

 Ce message n'a pas encore été noté.
Répondre en citant

http://www.lefigaro.fr/international/2010/11/24/01003-20101124ARTFIG00723-japon-le-drame-des-enfants-confisques.php
Ca se passe de commentaires mais il est bon de le rappeller parfois surtout pour ceux qui veulent se marier avec des japonais/es Sad

<Modération:
Je corrige l'url et je fusionne mais ton article n'apporte rien de nouveau à la situation que l'on connait déjà. >
Revenir en haut
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur Envoyer un message privé
Celice
Floodeur


Inscrit le: 16 Mar 2006
Messages: 87
Points: -296

MessagePosté le: 26 Nov 2010 08:15    Sujet du message:

 Ce message n'a pas encore été noté.
Répondre en citant

Lorsque je clique ca me marque "La page que vous avez demandée n'existe pas,
ou elle n'est plus accessible à cette adresse"

EDIT: OK c'est bon la.


Dernière édition par Celice le 27 Nov 2010 01:05; édité 1 fois
Revenir en haut
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur Envoyer un message privé
iriakun
1ere Dan
1ere Dan


Inscrit le: 19 Nov 2010
Messages: 708
Points: 2064

MessagePosté le: 26 Nov 2010 11:42    Sujet du message:

 Ce message n'a pas encore été noté.
Répondre en citant

Merci pour la fusion du post. Le but n'etait pas de rappeller la situation mais d'evoquer qu'elle est devenue tellement invivable qu'elle pousse au suicide Crying or Very sad
Quand je pense que meme la Chine a signe le traite, ca donne a reflechir.
Revenir en haut
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur Envoyer un message privé
Gillou
Modérateur


Inscrit le: 22 Mai 2004
Messages: 1150
Points: 11374
Pays, Ville: De retour à Paris

MessagePosté le: 26 Nov 2010 12:17    Sujet du message:

 Note du Post : 3.5   Nombre d'avis : 2
Répondre en citant

A noter que le Sénat a élaboré une proposition de résolution en la matière afin d'inciter les autorités japonaises à évoluer sur la question: http://www.senat.fr/leg/ppr09-674.html

Proposition qui, parait-il, se heurte à de fortes résistances et pressions de la part de l'Ambassade du Japon à Paris. Mais je pense que c'est une bonne initiative car plus ces affaires seront relayées, plus le Japon sera à mon avis enclin à évoluer, fût-ce plus ou moins sous la contrainte. Les japonais sont très soucieux de leur image à l'étranger, et des relais médiatiques efficaces peuvent largement contribuer à leur faire modifier leurs habitudes en la matière - même si, n'en doutons pas, ce sera une oeuvre de longue haleine.
Revenir en haut
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur Envoyer un message privé
Maitre K
Administrateur
Administrateur


Inscrit le: 20 Sep 2003
Messages: 2697
Points: 25951
Pays, Ville: Nishinomiya

MessagePosté le: 26 Nov 2010 14:06    Sujet du message:

 Ce message n'a pas encore été noté.
Répondre en citant

Citation:
Merci pour la fusion du post. Le but n'etait pas de rappeller la situation mais d'evoquer qu'elle est devenue tellement invivable qu'elle pousse au suicide Crying or Very sad
Quand je pense que meme la Chine a signe le traite, ca donne a reflechir.



Si tu ouvres les journaux français (ou suisses dans mon cas) à la page des faits divers, tu peux tomber de temps en temps sur d'horribles histoires d'ex-conjoints assassinés ou de parents qui se suicident avec leurs enfants à la suite de disputes concernant le droit de garde. Ces faits ne se passent pas au Japon, mais chez nous, dans des pays répondant aux "normes" européennes en matière de droit de garde. Certains parents inventent des histoires incroyables afin de discréditer l'autre parent pour qu'il ne puisse jouir du droit de garde, parfois même du droit de visite. J'ai donc bien peur que le problème soit à chercher bien au-delà d'une signature de traité...
_________________
I'm so gifted at findin' what I don't like the most
So I think it's time for us to have a toast
Revenir en haut
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur Envoyer un message privé
iriakun
1ere Dan
1ere Dan


Inscrit le: 19 Nov 2010
Messages: 708
Points: 2064

MessagePosté le: 29 Nov 2010 02:44    Sujet du message:

 Ce message n'a pas encore été noté.
Répondre en citant

J'ai relate plus d'une fois cette affaire autour de moi et tous mes collegues et amis japonais tombent des nues a chaque fois Shocked
Les medias japonais influent alias kishaclub risquent pas de relayer ces infos et j'espere que cette affaire sera rapidement resolue...au moins dans moins de 5 ans au pire 10 si j'en juge de la mauvaise volonte du Japon Evil or Very Mad
Revenir en haut
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur Envoyer un message privé
nooop
Ceinture Marron
Ceinture Marron


Inscrit le: 22 Jan 2008
Messages: 95
Points: 1123

MessagePosté le: 01 Déc 2010 06:43    Sujet du message:

 Note du Post : 4   Nombre d'avis : 3
Répondre en citant

Je suis également d'avis que le Japon devrait signer ce fameux traité, car il me paraît évident qu'un enfant à besoin de ses deux parents !

Pourtant je ne suis pas du tout d'accord avec ce que tu viens d'écrire: au Japon, et ce depuis toujours, la coutûme veut que les enfants soient élevés par les femmes - donc les mères - les pères n'ont qu'un rôle mineur dans cette affaire. Dans les cas de divorces 100% Japonais, la garde des enfants est confiée systématiquement à la mère, sauf cas exceptionnels. Les histoires de garde partagée, de garde d'un week-end sur 2 et la moitié des vacances, n'ont pas cours ici. Ca n'a donc rien d'étonnant à ce que :

1- Le Japon ne signe pas ce traité. Pourquoi signer quelque chose qui va à l'encontre de ce que l'on croit être "bien" ?

2- Les médias ne relayent pas l'information. Pourquoi relayer une information dont on ne se sent pas concerné ?

3- Les japonais ne soient pas en courant. Et même s'ils le seraient, en quoi ça changerait quelque chose vu leur conception de l'éducation ?

Tu réfléchis avec ta culture française/ européenne et tu juges sans chercher à comprendre la culture japonaise.
Je ne cherche pas à excuser le Japon de ne pas signer ce traité, bien au contraire, je ne peut que constater avec tristesse que rien ne bouge de ce côté là. Mais il y a des raisons, culturelles, à prendre en compte si l'on veut que les choses changent peu à peu... c'est bien simple, plus tu condamnes, plus tu t'offusques devant tes collègues Japonais, plus ils se sentiront incompris - ou mettront tout sur la différence culturelle - sans chercher à réfléchir ou remettre en question leurs idées reçues.


Dernière édition par nooop le 01 Déc 2010 08:38; édité 1 fois
Revenir en haut
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur Envoyer un message privé
Montrer les messages depuis:   
Poster un nouveau sujet   Répondre au sujet    ForumJapon.com Index du Forum -> Le Japon dans le Monde Toutes les heures sont au format GMT + 1 Heure
Aller à la page 1, 2, 3, 4  Suivante
Page 1 sur 4

 
Sauter vers:  
Vous ne pouvez pas poster de nouveaux sujets dans ce forum
Vous ne pouvez pas répondre aux sujets dans ce forum
Vous ne pouvez pas éditer vos messages dans ce forum
Vous ne pouvez pas supprimer vos messages dans ce forum
Vous ne pouvez pas voter dans les sondages de ce forum


Powered by phpBB 2.0.16 © 2001, 2002 phpBB Group (Traduction par : phpBB-fr.com)